Green Recovery to be fundamental aspect of Covid-19 recovery plan | eTactica

Green Recovery to be fundamental aspect of Covid-19 recovery plan

Mayors from cities in Europe, the US and Africa plan to coordinate their efforts to support a low-carbon, sustainable recovery from the crisis as national governments begin to implement huge economic stimulus packages.

World leaders aim to shape green recovery from coronavirus crisis

Scientists worldwide have like all of us detected positive change to the environment during the Covid-19 shut down. Pictures and measurements have shown us all how much we can achieve towards global sustainability initiatives if we manage to put and maintain our focus on an environmentally focused recovery of the world’s economy.

Mayors from cities in Europe, the US and Africa plan to coordinate their efforts to support a low-carbon, sustainable recovery from the crisis as national governments begin to implement huge economic stimulus packages.

Us at eTactica and others in the industry need to support those initiatives by educating those who want to listen on how much carbon emissions we we can avoid by putting everyone’s focus on energy efficiency. We could even in a few years close down all coal-fired power plants.

We are all responsible for the green recovery

By focusing on our own consumption and asking our self questions on whether goods and services we buy are produced in a responsible and sustainable way, we can take the first steps towards a more sustainable world. By focusing on your own energy efficiency and choosing an energy provider that delivers only green energy you are helping us all to close down coal-fired power plants and therefore minimize our carbon footprint.

DACTP9 The setting sun illuminates cooling towers of a brown coal power station of the power company Vattenfall in Jaenschwalde, Germany, 15 December 2011. The power station is the biggest of its kind with an output of 3.000 megawatt, according to Vattenfall. 90.000tons of brown coal are processed daily at the power station. Photo: Patrick Pleul